Snoring & How to Deal With It!

It’s a SNORE subject (har har har) for all backpackers. Snoring. Some of us snore. Some of us don’t. Personally, I’m a snorer…90% of the time. Now for most people, on a regular night when we’re sleeping alone in our room, the fact that we snore or don’t snore isn’t a problem because we’re ALONE. If you’re in a relationship, ok, one partner will likely wake up every night to alert you of your snoring (which does nothing! It’s not as if snorers can hit the ‘off’ button). And if you’re snoring after a one night stand….it’ll probably end up being just that…. a one night stand….because people HATE SNORERS!!! Now that’s in the regular world of single people and couples. Backpacking is very, very, very different and it would greatly assist the ‘backpacker’ to review some unspoken rules that I’ve put together.

What causes snoring

I will preface this by saying that 2 months prior to my latest backpacking journey I researched remedies for snoring and I religiously went to acupuncture to curtail my snoring (which cost me almost $300 and that’s a lot for a traveler to put into snoring prevention). Did the acupuncture work? Yes. I recorded myself during the time periods between visits and I wasn’t snoring. But….it didn’t last into my journey. So, I wouldn’t recommend this treatment for a traveler. I would recommend it though for stationary maintenance . And now we start the list.

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#1. Most importantly. Know what you’re getting into. If you’re roughing it…you’re going to be sleeping in a tent with one or several people. If you’re staying in a hostel and trying to save money, you’re going to be sleeping in a room with four, eight or possibly 20 different people. There’s a give and take. You’ll get off paying $10-$30 for a bed and will have to put up with snoring, farting, people who talk in their sleep, people who have night terrors, rude people who talk on their cell phone in the bedroom, smelly people, messy people, drunk people, people trying to bang and people having different sleeping habits than your own. Don’t expect it to be ‘your space’. Sometimes you’ll luck out because most backpackers are respectful and hey….they’re just trying to save money while they travel too.. so they ‘get it’. But….know what you’re getting into. ANYTHING GOES. Just like the guy who was talking non-stop to himself in his sleep saying, ‘Tomorrow I have to brush my teeth’, ‘I should’ve taken a shower tonight’, ‘I really need to buy a new toothbrush’…did I find that annoying? No…I found it hysterical and laughed myself to sleep. It’s all part of the experience.

#2. Invest in some good ear plugs. If you’re a non-snorer or a light sleeper. Get some ear plugs! They’re cheap and there are a lot of good brands out there. Get several different ones. If you want to sleep…you’ll need em. If you’re a snorer…BRING EARPLUGS EVERYWHERE. I brought a stock of about 6 ear plugs with me to each hostel. I would write a note that said, ‘Hey. I snore. I’m sorry. Here are some free ear plugs’…and I’d leave it on the desk, sink or couch in the common area of the room. I was just being courteous because I know how annoying snoring can be. At least if you do that…fellow travelers won’t sneer at you when you pass them going to the bathroom in the morning.

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#3. This one is really important. DON’T BLAME THE PERSON WHO SNORES. Seriously dude. They can’t help it. And if they can…there are very few effective remedies for snoring that snorers can employ while traveling (see #4). When backpacking, I feel bad EVERY NIGHT that my snoring keeps people up. Sometimes I even stay up as late as possible, until 3-4am just so most people can have a good nights rest before I start wailing away like a monster. Occasionally, I’ll sleep in the lounge if there is one in the hostel…just in case I snore. Should I (or other snorers for that matter) have to do that? Should we sacrifice sleep and go on 4 hours a night of rest just so the 7 other people in the room can relax? No. Not at all. I mean…we paid for a bed too. But most people give snorers a lot of crap… like this weener. And in reality it’s the non-snorers fault. If you can’t handle snoring…you should do the research & testing and find a pair of good earplugs for yourself. Or book a hotel or B&B where you can have complete silence for your sensitive ear drums. You’re in a hostel. Deal with it. Take some responsibility. Don’t blame anyone but yourself. I love when I walk into a room at 2am and a few people are snoring….it makes me feel like less of an asshole. When in truth the guy who’s tossing and turning underneath me that DIDN’T TAKE THE FREE EARPLUGS I GAVE HIM is the bigger asshole.

#4. This is for snorers. Remedy the problem as best as you can. Are you a fellow snoring backpacker? Don’t have 10 grand for the sinus surgery that probably won’t work? Want to know what works? BREATH RIGHT STRIPS. That’s right. Breath right strips. Invest in them. I brought bag of them with me on the last trip. They don’t eliminate your snoring….but they do cut it down by 20-30% and that’s pretty good. That means your heavy, dying sea animal snore has now turned into a light, waves crashing in the ocean snore, and that’s awesome & acceptable for most people (not that you should care because other people SHOULD HAVE EARPLUGS). What else works? Cut your alcohol consumption. REALLY difficult to do while you’re traveling but…alcohol has an effect on the muscles in your throat and you’re guaranteed to snore (or snore louder) when you’re drinking. So if you’re a drinker, just get DAY DRUNK, it’ll make your trip extra exciting OR just stop drinking 1-2 hours before bed. Lastly, steaming your throat will loosen up your throat muscles and your sinuses. 15 minutes of that before bed and you won’t snore at all. But who has time for that while backpacking? So…a cup of tea or a hot shower will suffice.

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If you’re reading this…you’re most likely wide awake at 3am, scanning the internet on your smart phone to find a way to deal with the snorers in your hostel. And that’s just it. DEAL WITH IT. Go get some earplugs that work. They’re cheap. Some hostels even give them out for free. Don’t complain about how hard you’ve got it because you can’t get your precious sleep while you’re backpacking the globe, something a large majority of the worlds population will never get to do. Suck it up. Train your mind. Put aside your petty troubles. Meditate. Do your best to become a heavy sleeper. Be a sleep magician like me. Once I put my head down on the pillow, I’m usually out in 3 seconds. You’re in a hostel. Anything goes. Someone could stumble into the room screaming. Someone could snore. Someone could break a window. Someone could pee on you in a drunken stupor (happened to me). Who knows…..but ya know what I know? I’m getting my sleep…loud room or not. Once again. Acceptance. Earplugs. Courtesy. Respect. Breath Right Strips. Sleep. Repeat as often as necessary.

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Thanks for reading this M.A.V.B.L.O.G. I hope it’s helped your current hosteling sleep situation and/or enlightened you to the world of backpacking. As always. Do your best. Do better. Be good to yourself. Be good to others. Even plants, animals and rocks. Follow The Golden Rule. Now get some rest…

 

Vienna, Austria for Backpackers

Vienna. What comes to mind when you think of Vienna? Classical music concerts, Beethoven, The Vienna Opera House… Some of the staples of Vienna. Right? Those things are great about this city and well worth getting immersed in….but Vienna actually is a pretty cool place apart from the classical music scene. Is it a party city? No. It’s not Berlin. But, it’s certainly worth a visit. I’ve spent a good amount of time exploring Vienna over the years and will provide some tips & hints for discovering Vienna. It’s not the cheapest city, but it’s certainly do-able if you’re budget minded. First up…..Schnitzel.

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Being part Austrian, no schnitzel will ever be like Grandma’s schnitzel, but Vienna’s got some KICK ASS choices. I’ve eaten 5 dollar schnitzels in Vienna and even a 50 dollar one (which wasn’t very good). Here are my top two picks. If you’re on a budget, check out Schnitzelwirt. The meal will set you back $10-$15 bucks….and it’s gigantic. You can basically eat the meal as lunch and dinner and you’ll still have some to take home. It tastes great. The restaurant is nice and you’ll be surrounded by Austrian locals. Overall it’s a fun time. Next…and my favorite is Zum Figlmuller. There’s really only one thing you can order on the menu and that is the Figlmuller-Schnitzel. It’s so amazing! It’s huge! It tastes so good! The meat is pounded so thin that the schnitzel will flop over your plate. And you’ve gotta get it with the mixed salad or potato salad. This meal will probably set you back about $20-$25 bucks but it’s well worth it. And you’ll either have leftovers or you’ll be full for the next 24 hours. I recommend going to the Wollzeile location. Make reservations here!…and unless it’s a touristy season the wait is just 10-15 minutes long. Oh yeah…no beer is served. Only wine. Lots of people online give Figlmuller crap and say the schnitzel isn’t good…..but sorry man. THE SCHNITZEL IS AMAAAZZZING!!!!

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If you’re on a really tight budget, go to one of the many Kebab stands in the city. They’re all over the place and they ROCK THE SOCKS. I think I’ve eaten at about 75% of them in the entire city. One visit I was obsessed. That’s all I ate. There’s a really good one in the Naschmarkt, which is another place you’ve gotta visit. It’s a big flea market/food market. Take a 30 minute stroll there and check out the sites and smells of Vienna. It can be reached easily because the U-bahn system in Vienna is really simple to use. Just go to a kiosk and select a 24-hr, 48-hr or 72-hr unlimited travel card (well worth it). After that you’ve gotta check out Stadtpark, Vienna’s central park, and spend about an hour or so just walking around and hanging out. During the night it’s just as pretty, but I’d go during the day because it’s nicer. And not that it’s dangerous, but on occasion you can get the random drunken lout wandering around at night. Next stop….Schonbrunn Palace. It’s a 20 minute U-bahn ride on the U4 green line and about a 45 minute walk to get from the subway platform to the Gloriette at the top. If you’re into the history, take the tour inside the palace, but I’ve always just walked around the immense palace grounds and gardens. Give yourself a few hours for this. The view is amazing. It’s free. Bring a picnic. Take a nap. Meditate. It’s awesome. Also, during the winter they have a Christkindlemarkt there, which is doubly as awesome. Hot punch. Friendly people. Great snacks. Crisp air. Christmas lights. What more could you want? Now if you’ve got the time…go to the Tiergarten Schonnbrun. It’s the oldest zoo in the world and is right next to Schonnbrun Palace. I wouldn’t recommend going there if you only had a couple of days in Vienna. But if you’re there anywhere from 4-7 days. Check it out.

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A lesser talked about destination in Vienna is the Hundertwasserhaus. It’s an architectural and artistic masterpiece. A trip there will change your life and calm your soul. Well worth it and something that you wouldn’t expect in Vienna. Some other fun stuff to do? It’s a big city and I’d advise a little bit of wandering, especially if you have the unlimited U-bahn ticket. Hop on an above ground tram, cruise the main ring (Ringstrasse), and/or just take the U-bahn and ride around. Some good places to see are the Prater (Praterstern U-bahn stop), the Rathaus (Rathaus U-bahn stop), the Karlsplatz U-bahn station used to be filled with bums, but now it’s cleaned up, and there’s the Opera Toilet (you HAVE to see it) and of course Stephansdom (Stephansplatz U-bahn stop). Even if you’re not religious….when you have a chance to see an 850-year old church…..go see it! It’s remarkable. You’ll get hounded outside by 20 guys dressed as Beethoven selling tickets to cheesy concerts, but just ignore them. Once and a while they have nighttime concerts inside the church (well worth paying if available-they sell those at the ticket booth located outside of the church). Up for some ice cream or gelato? Go anywhere that has the EIS sign. They’re scattered throughout the city. My favorite one is near the Reumannplatz subway stop, but that’s just me.

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The Vienna Concert Cafes are really cool. Time your visit right and you can sit and enjoy a classical concert for the price of a cup of coffee. And if you’re smart….you’ll shell out the extra Euros and order the Kaiserschmarren (Austria’s staple dessert). If you’re adventurous you can head over to Bratislava for the day. It’s a good place to see. The commuter train is only an hour long and it’s about a $20 dollar round trip ticket. The exchange rate was awesome and I did some shopping on the cheap there, but that was in 2007 (In 2009 they adopted the Euro). Back in Vienna proper, if you’re a horse enthusiast, seeing The Spanish Riding School will definitely be a highlight, but if you’re not, it’ll be a waste of time and money for you so just take the nice, romantic horse drawn carriage through the cobblestone streets if you’re with your spouse/partner/lover. That way you can see the city from a different vantage point.

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If you’re looking to go out and get some drinks….hang at some of the bars in the Bermuda Triangle (just a grouping of bars in a triangular area of streets). It makes for some easy bar hopping and late night kebab eating. Crossfield’s Australian Pub (near the Opera) is also worth the visit. Beers. Trivia games. A comfortable atmosphere….and you can eat grasshoppers if you want! That’s right. Grasshoppers! They’re crunchy!… Down for Karaoke? Hit up Mai Kai and belt out some tunes. It’s a chill spot. Where to sleep you ask? Well…. Hotel Furstenhof ain’t the cheapest place ($60-$75/night) for a bohemian half-hotel, half-hostel) but it’s certainly got some charm. There’s always Wombats Hostel ($20-$30/night) or you can take a quick look on Hostelworld.com. There’s plenty of em’ to choose from. As for regular hotels…they can be a bit pricey in this town….but look nonetheless. They run some deals and specials from time to time. Hotel Karntnerhof is a good one to try. It’s not too close to the action but not too far away.

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Museums? Yes to them all. If you’ve got the time of course. If you’re gonna pick just one….I’d say that you’d have to see Albertina. Also, take one of the Danube River tours (Stift Melk is a good one [uber awesome if you’re a librarian] and check out Durnstein and Krems while you’re there) or a take walk in the Wienerwald (it’s really special. Autumn is the best time for this). If you’ve hired a car or have the money for a taxi, head out of the city to a traditional Heuriger restaurant. It’s no German beer hall, with the singing and dancing, but it’s just as awesome in it’s own way. Grab a nice lunch and try the new Austrian wines or some ‘Sturm’ if it’s in season. Another very fun ‘free’ thing to do is go to Stephansdom and walk in the direction of Karlsplatz. As you walk, just watch the street performers. There’s a dance group that shows up (almost everyday) near the church and draws a big crowd. Sometimes there are classical music groups or guitar players that are good to watch. You can tip them or just waltz on by.

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There’s plenty to do in Vienna and I’ll say again that it’s really worth a visit. The best time of year to go is probably in mid to late September or early October. Autumn in Vienna is perfect. Not that other seasons in Vienna are bad. The spring is amazing when the flowers are in bloom, the summer is great (but a bit hot because of all the recent heat waves) and the winter, though a bit dreary in parts of the city, it’s beautiful because the Christmas markets are out and a fresh snowfall in Vienna is pretty stunning. Anytime that you go, you’ll have a good time. I’ve given you a large amount of stuff to check out but don’t limit yourself. Check out the tourist maps (available at most shops and hostels) and see what they suggest. Also, do some of the classical music concerts if that’s your sole reason for visiting. And again, wander around….wander, wander, wander. It’s fun. You might just stumble into this place ‘Burg Kino’, which is perfect if you’re an Orson Welles fan. And if you’re flying in or out, be sure to use the CAT train shuttle (about $15 bucks). The airport is a ways away from the center city and you’ll end up paying 40-50 Euros for a cab ride.

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I hope you’ve enjoyed this M.A.V.B.L.O.G. and my tips for Vienna, Austria. If you’d like further assistance in planning your trip, feel free to contact me on twitter @odiemcconnell or via e-mail at mcconnellfavors@gmail.com.  As always. Do your best. Treat others with respect… people, animals and plants alike. And follow The Golden Rule. Have a great day!